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Google's latest April Fool's Prank

      Google has done it again! Just in time for the April Fool's Day, Google introduced Google Maps Quest, a retro 8-bit version of its mapping tool... which is completely awesome! In the video available below, Google employees introduce the new version for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES), replete with finicky cartridge and the vintage 8-bit music.



      With this new Google Maps Quest, one can do all the things that can already be done on the regular Google Map. You can search for famous landmarks and sites around the world like the Taj Mahal, Agra, India.


      You can also get detailed directions to avoid dangerous paths, and battle your way through a world of powerful monsters and mystic treasures. You can see the sequence of following images at lat-long 0,0 at incremental zoom levels starting from zoom level 9.








       To use this awesome 8-bit (from your computer of course), head over to Google Maps and simply click on the Quest box in the top right corner. You would then be whisked away to the 8-bit land of fun! Be sure to try out the Street View in the 8-bit land.

       This NES cartridge will be the first in 18 years to be released (if it really would be!) and also there is already a version in development for the Game Boy. Does Google have anything else up its sleeve this April's Fool Day!?

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