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Integrated GPS cameras...

          GeoSpatial Experts has introduced three new GPS Camera bundles designed specifically for geotagging and mapping digital photographs. The firm now offers its popular GPS-Photo Link 5.0 photo-mapping software with the new Ricoh G700SE, Sony A55, and Casio EX-H20G GPS cameras.

          All of the GPS cameras below will provide you with geotagged photos, additionally, some can also offer the ability to capture the direction the photo was taken with a built-in compass, or the ability to collect attribute data in the field. WiFi and Bluetooth will allow you to communicate with laser range finder equipment to measure exact distance from the photographer to the item being photographed. Some GPS cameras provide a ruggedized camera to withstand harsh conditions. 

          In 2007, Ricoh introduced its 500SE model as the first GPS-equipped SLR designed for GIS data collection, and the new G700SE is more compact and offers many upgrades. Fully ruggedized and waterproof to five meters, the G700SE has 12.1 mega-pixel resolution, Bluetooth and WiFi, HD quality video, image stabilization, 5X optical and 4X digital zoom, and GPS/Compass module. Its data collection capacity includes 20 memo fields, each with 100 sub-categories.


          Sony A55 – One of Sony’s first Single Lens Translucent digital cameras, the A55 with built-in GPS offers a live view similar to compact cameras, but it also has full-time DSLR style phase-detection autofocus. In addition, the Sony A55 has a 16.2 mega-pixel sensor, three-inch articulated LCD, full HD video recording, and 3D Sweep Panorama Mode.



          Casio EX-H20G – Compact enough to fit in your pocket, the EX-H20G boasts a 24 mm wide-angle, 10X optical zoom, and 14.1 mega-pixel resolution. Casio calls it the ‘works everywhere’ camera because its Hybrid-GPS system continues to track the user’s location inside a building with sensors when no GPS signals are available. And the EX-H20G is always ready to use thanks to continuous GPS signal tracking even when the camera is turned off.

         GeoSpatial Experts first developed GPS-Photo Link in 2001, and it has become the industry standard software for digital photo mapping. Photo-mapping applications span the full spectrum of business users whose jobs require accurate photographic documentation of objects and features at a specific place and time. These applications include disaster response, infrastructure assessment, zoning, code inspection, asset management, engineering, land management, surveying, utility mapping and law enforcement.

         The introduction of high-quality GPS cameras from some of the best known names in digital photography highlights the growing role that photo mapping is playing in mainstream business applications.

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