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ESRI's Storytelling with Maps Competition kicks off

                Some of the best stories are told not with pictures but with maps! The storytelling potential of maps has increased dramatically over the years with the evolution of geographic information system (GIS) technology, the Internet, and mobile applications. In recognition of this trend, Esri is inviting users to enter their most compelling web map or mobile app in the Storytelling with Maps contest.

                The rules for the contest are simple: 
  • Your web map or mobile app must have been created primarily using ESRI software products.
  • ArcGIS files such as MXD, LYR, and LPK/MPK files are not eligible for this contest.
  • You can submit multiple entries as long as each submission is unique. 
  • All entries must be submitted through arcgis.com, the website for ArcGIS Online content.
  • The deadline to receive entries is 11:59 p.m. (PDT) Friday, June 10, 2011.
The web map or mobile app will be judged by a panel of GIS professionals and the ArcGIS community. The winners of the contest will be publicized and promoted at the ESRI International User Conference in July, as well as various publications, articles and blogs. The first place winner will receive an etched plaque, one copy of the National Geographic Atlas, 9th Edition, and one copy of  Cartographica Extraordinaire. The second and the third place winners will receive an etched plaque and one copy of  Cartographica Extraordinaire each. First 500 applicants who submit an entry will receive a free T-shirt.

So come on all! Put on your mapping and storytelling cap and come up with a brilliant story using maps! All the best. So long!

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