Friday, February 25, 2011

Delhi Metro's Airport Express Corridor mapped on GIS...


         The Delhi Metro's showcase Airport Express Corridor, connecting the Indira Gandhi International Airport to the heart of the Delhi, was rolled out for the public on the 23rd of February, 2011.


         This is the first line in India to be mapped on GIS to enhance safety, maintenance and traffic regulation. Mapping the corridor on GIS will help in mobilising emergency services in case of a blast or fire on the train. Delhi Airport Metro Express Private Limited, the company operating the line, has mapped all the emergency services, including fire stations, police stations, hospitals, etc. along the alignment.


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Wednesday, February 23, 2011

SSA to take up GIS mapping of schools

          Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan (SSA), Karnataka, has embarked upon an ambitious project of mapping nearly 74,000 educational institutions, including junior colleges, in the State using the geographical information system (GIS) to bolster education by making best use of school infrastructure and to facilitate planning and development.


          Karnataka is the fourth State after Andhra Pradesh, Gujarat and Chhattisgarh to go for electronic mapping of schools, including aided and unaided schools. There are about 46,000 primary schools, 12,000 primary aided schools and 16,000 high schools and junior colleges in the State.

          The GIS mapping of schools in the State may be taken up on the model developed in Andhra Pradesh. The GIS software developed in Andhra Pradesh is being customised by the National Informatics Centre for storing, analysing and displaying geographical data of schools.

          The Union Ministry of Human Resource Development has given the green signal to the SSA-Karnataka for taking up the project in view of the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act or Right to Education (RTE) Act, 2010.

          Data collection will be undertaken by visiting schools and at least 10 photographs of infrastructure in each school such as classrooms, playground, drinking water facility, school compound, toilets, etc., will be incorporated in the project.

          GIS mapping of schools would help strengthen school education and serve as a key tool for planning and developing school infrastructure after taking geographical factors into consideration.

          Data on schools updated every year by the Department of Public Instruction will be incorporated in the project. The project would help the authorities to know the exact location of schools, distance between two schools, and habitations that lack schools. It would take at least eight to 10 months for collecting field data. The GIS map of schools would be ready by December-end or early next year.

          The Karnataka State Remote Sensing Applications Centre would be supporting the project and added that data on roads, water bodies, human habitation, green cover, etc., would be incorporated while mapping schools.
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Sunday, February 13, 2011

Map Your Valentine...

            Google has now made it possible for you to remind that "Special someone" of that "Special moment" that you'll spent together at that "Special place"! With Google's new "Map Your Valentine", you can send a Valentine's eCard but with a twist - remembering a special place. It integrates with Google Maps and places the map inside a heart. So now you can send an eCard with your "Special" location and say "Remember the first gift I gave you?..." Or maybe something more romantic...

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Friday, February 11, 2011

Fusion Table - Heat Map Layer

    In continuation with the previous example on Fusion Table, we will have a look at another Fusion Table layer example. Today's point of discussion is heat map! What is a heat map? A heat map is geographical representation of data where the values taken by a variable in two-dimensional map are represented as colors. Higher the value of the variable, that place on the map would be represented with a deeper color.

    This example is very much similar to the previous one, just for one minor change! Let us have a look at the code.



    I have just used a readily available Google Fusion Table for this example. Any anomalies in the data is not my responsibility! Copy the above code in an html file and open it in your browser! You will see the fusion table heat map layer in action! The only change in this code from the previous one is that, the heatmap property of the fusion table layer is made true! The output of the above code looks as seen in the result section above!

    If you have any queries or doubts regarding the above code, please feel free to leave a comment! Till next time....Happy Mapping!
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Tuesday, February 8, 2011

Fusion Table Layer...

    Today we will have a look at the "Fusion Table" Layer example. But before we start with the actual code, we will have a look at what Fusion Table is. Google Fusion Table is a free service for sharing and visualizing data online. It allows you to share data, merge data from multiple tables into interesting derived tables, and see the most up-to-date data from all sources. There is a lot of documentation about Google Fusion Table available on the web. You can visit their home page or the Google Research Blog to gather more information about Fusion Tables.

    Let us have a look at the following code. The code is very short and simple to understand!


    The few things to look out for in the above code are:
  • The manner in which mapTypeId has been specified! In other Google Maps API v3 examples, we have seen that we specify mapTypeID as ROADMAP, SATELLITE, etc. i.e., all the letters are in uppercase and not in quotes! However, in this example we are required to specify mapTypeID as 'roadmap' or 'satellite', etc.
  • Look up the line layer = new google.maps.FusionTablesLayer(376526). The number in the brackets is the "dsrcid" of the fusion table. Every Fusion Table has this dsrcid and can be seen in the address bar when the Fusion Table is opened.
    You can copy the above code in a html file and open it in your default browser. You will see the Fusion Table Layer on Google Map in action! The output will be as seen in the result section above.

     I have used a ready-made publicly shared Fusion Table. You can also create your own Fusion Table and share it with the world! If you have any queries regarding this example or Fusion Tables leave a comment! Till then happy mapping!
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Friday, February 4, 2011

What do you do with Google Maps API...?

            By now we definitely know that Google Maps API stands out amongst other applications in creating interactive world maps. There are a couple of others which may be static, 2D or even 3D, etc, but Google maps have unique and distinctive features that make experienced webmasters prefer them over others.

            Besides, being a great way to locate and navigate to places, Google maps API also provides many area and length measurement functions. These APIs’ allow for the development of web applications like measure distances and land features online with the Google maps embedded in them.

            The Google Maps API has been considerably the most popular mapping API in the world. The Google Maps API delivers the standard interactive, easy-to-use features which are beneficial for your business. Google Maps API has made it easy for companies to include fully interactive Google Maps on their public and internal websites. The Maps API helps your customers and employees make the right business and purchasing decisions by visualizing important information on a familiar map.

            From the above information we can understand the ease of use imparted by the Google map APIs’.  In the examples discussed so far we have seen how to use the Google Maps API, but actually using it for your business purposes are two totally different aspects.

            We have all felt comfortable about the easy codes that can be developed and the sample applications which can be made with the API, but is it really so effortless to use it in some real time applications? I would appreciate if you all share some of your ideas as to how you'll have put the Google Maps API to use in real time or propose to put them to use in some application.

            Go ahead and post your innovative ideas here...Till then happy mapping!
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Thursday, February 3, 2011

KML Layer Example

         Until now, we have covered various examples involving markers, polylines, polygons, i.e. creating overlays. We have also seen other examples to remove overlays! We will now move on to some other concepts. Today we will have a look at what KML is and how to create a KML layer!

         Let us first understand what KML is and why is it necessary. KML stands for Keyhole Markup Language which is an XML schema for expressing geographic annotation and visualisation within 2D maps and 3D Earth browsers. The KML file specifies a set of features (place marks, images, polygons, 3D models, textual descriptions, etc.) for display in Google Earth, Maps and Mobile, or any other 3D Earth browser (geobrowser) implementing the KML encoding. Each place always has a latitude and a longitude. Other data can make the view more specific, such as tilt, heading, altitude, which together define a "camera view".

         So what we understand from this is that we can create geographic information in a tag structured file and then place its geographic contents on the base google map which helps us display the required information more effectively and attractively.

         Let us have a look at the following example now. In the example, I have used a KML file which shows the wild life sanctuaries in India. I haven't created that file and have used one which was directly available on the web! The KML file always needs to be hosted on your web server. Discrepancies in the data of the KML file if any, is not my fault. Copy the following code in a text file and save it with .html extension. Click on this file and it will open up in your default internet browser and you will see your KML layered map in action!



         The output of the above code will look as seen in the results section of the above live code. The above code is pretty simple and would be easily understood! If you have any queries or doubts regarding the above code, please leave them as comments. Till then, happy mapping!
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